How promotional products can fuel fusion and guerilla marketing

How fusion and guerrilla marketing can fuel marketing with promotional products

Fusion marketing and guerilla marketing are methods of spreading brand awareness that go beyond traditional tactics. They involve a hands-on approach that brings personality to the marketing process through unique methods. It's a way for you to connect with both other businesses and new customers to maximize returns on your advertising budget.

Integrate with peers
Fusion marketing, sometimes called "tie-ins" or "collaborative marketing," is a strategic alliance between businesses to boost visibility without increasing the advertising budget. It's a creative way to reach new audiences. A few ways to achieve this is by sharing mailing lists, linking to each other's websites and exchanging promotional products. 

According to Entrepreneur, there are several reasons to seek out a fusion marketing plan with another business. Two companies may have similar business goals, attitudes and mindsets about marketing or share the same target market and audience. Fusion marketing also requires a willingness to share and give on both sides. Basically, the businesses must be either complimentary or supplementary. Complimentary businesses where the customers and products are related are called "power partners." Some examples are airlines and hotels, or construction and architecture firms.

One popular way to integrate fusion marketing is with discounts for the other business. If you are distributing personalized pads, like the Girona Weekly Custom Pocket Journal, you can slip a coupon for your partner firm in the front cover. Another way to try this business tactic is with promotional mugs that represent your brand. When you give the mugs to customers, attach a coupon for them to receive a discount on their next cup of coffee at a local cafe.

Think outside the box
Fusion marketing can be part of a guerilla marketing plan. Guerrilla marketing is a term coined by Jay Conrad Levinson to imply untraditional advertising practices. Levinson published his first book on the subject in 1984 and ultimately spread his marketing ideas worldwide through updated versions and guest lecturing appearances. Guerrilla marketing was designed for small businesses that cannot necessarily afford the marketing mixes corporations invest in. Levinson claims it is beneficial for smaller firms because it's easily understood and implemented without costing the big bucks.

Levinson described the soul and essence of guerrilla marketing as, "achieving conventional goals, such as profits and joy, with unconventional methods, such as investing energy instead of money."

Guerilla marketing campaigns that make the headlines are usually large-scale and pricey, but the term has really evolved to include any type of promotion that is creative and inexpensive. Young, Fabulous and Self-Employed Magazine suggested companies related to the technology industry use promotional products such as promotional flash drives and custom imprinted mouse pads to fuel brand loyalty. Include these items with every purchase so customers are always looking at your logo as they go about their business on the computer.

Another way to engage in guerilla marketing with custom promotional products is with a small street marketing team, according to the technology information company Mevvy. Traditionally, this role would be to distribute informational flyers, but promo products will have a greater impact because they offer more value. Decide if your objectives lend themselves more toward unique promotional products that will impress potential consumers or highly practical items that they will use every day. Where your promotion team sets up depends on the industry and market you're in. Think about whether your goal is to talk to a maximum number of people or harness conversations with fewer. Once you have a plan, brief your street team on the objectives and ideal talking points. Pictures of the team out and about will also be perfect for the business' social media sites. 

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